Columns

Wed
25
Mar
Edgar's picture

Along the Way

Along the Way

As I write this, we are about a week into selfdistancing due to Covid-19. My three kids are being h o m e - schooled, I haven’t left the house except to make a

Kroger run, and life as we knew it before the coronavirus quarantine is no more.

Even though this sometimes seems like the Twilight Zone, I fully recognize that it’s true and that it’s redefining priorities and perspectives.

When this is over, I know I won’t be the same.

 

 

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Wed
25
Mar
Edgar's picture

Hey, Let’s Talk!

Hey, Let’s Talk!

Yes, … there – I said it. I apologize for thinking that I had invented a new Italian dish as in the B r o d o Classico or Pasta Broth that I wrote about a few columns back, Mi Dispiace’. Although as a disclaimer, I did mutter that the simple broth I thought I had invented couldn’t possibly be new and surely should have been discovered earlier. AND, yep - it had; In 1550 in Northern Italy and called Tortellini En Brodo. When I sent the original column out by email one of my earliest readers and oldest friend, Janis from South Louisiana, pointed out that when she lived in Italy there was a broth like the one I had “discovered”.

Wed
25
Mar
Edgar's picture

Did You Know?

Did You Know?

With the interest in the preserving of the Nabors Trailers Sign headed up by David Calhoun it appears appropriate for a historical article to be written about W.C. Nabors, the owner and founder of the Nabors Trailers Company. W.C. (Will) Nabors was born in Naborton, La. on Dec. 16, 1877. There aren’t many people living today that knew Mr. Nabors personally. This writer knew him but not on a social level.

Wed
18
Mar
Edgar's picture

Hey, Let’s Talk!

Hey, Let’s Talk!

What?! Yes, I bought several of these 2” thick 25” wide laminated wood countertops at Southeastern Freight in Shreveport, La. Well, it’s actually Acacia Wood but there was another called Curupa Wood from Bolivia that was even more dramatic than the Acacia Wood from Thailand I liked. I bastardized the name when I called in to check availability and couldn’t remember Curupa. All I could remember was that the name sounded like that little South American monster called the Chupacabra. It’s supposed to be kinda bat-like and vaguely canine looking and feeds by sucking blood from cows and goats. In fact its name really means “Goat Sucker” in Spanish. One was supposedly captured in Mexico awhile back but it really only looked like a coyote with mange. BUT, my lifesaver - Anna Dunn - tells me that one was plaguing Grand Cane a couple of years back killing cats and dogs. She said she saw it and remembers long hind legs kinda like a rabbit!

Wed
18
Mar
Edgar's picture

Did You Know?

Did You Know?

The other day I had a conversation about the food for the winter of this area about 150 years ago that stirred my “Historical Senses”. During and shortly after the Civil War hard times for everyone, especially the rural and small towns of North Louisiana. The population was largely Anglo-Celtic or African in origin with some Spanish-French along the eastern edge of DeSoto Parish and to Natchitoches southward. Corn and pork were the main crops but there were three times more hogs than beef cattle. There were Irish and sweet potatoes and some sugar cane for making syrup. Cotton was by far the major money crop.

Wed
11
Mar
Edgar's picture

The Farm Wife:

Article Image Alt Text
The Farm Wife:

If you are a living, breathing being, you must have water to survive. For the birds, usually a simple birdbath will work.

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Wed
11
Mar
Edgar's picture

Did You Know?

Did You Know?

During and after the Civil War Louisianans were faced with many unbearable problems? Our northwest Louisiana area faced the hardship and cruelty inflicted by the Carpet Baggers. (Northern troops and individuals sent after the war to enforce new privileges and laws.) But central and south Louisiana had tremendous problems with the Jayhawkers.

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Wed
04
Mar
Edgar's picture

The Business Doctor

The Business Doctor

I am going to try and unpack this monster of medical terminology and global business into two articles that we country folks can understand.

There is s phenomenon known as a “Chain Reaction or Chain Effect or Domino Effect,” which is the cumulative effect when one event sets off another, and so on. Sometimes the results are similar, and sometimes it ripples. This is known as a “Ripple Effect,” which is not cumulative (broken up with delays). For example, a ripple can be created when a same-sex marriage may have little impact on friends, but it can cause a ripple effect on family members. The same with a divorce of a husband and wife—little impact on friends but a big impact on the kids. Some viruses on the global economy cause Ripples and other Dominoes.

Wed
04
Mar
Edgar's picture

Did You Know?

Did You Know?

A continuation of “Old DeSoto and Mansfield” from last week’s article will be the theme this week. Many of our citizens never realized there was a gunpowder factory in Mansfield located on Franklin St. It was a successful factory that made powder for shotgun shells and dynamite. The DuPont Company bought up the smaller plants like the one in Mansfield to get a monopoly on the business.

During the depression years a program was developed under F.D.R. to put men to work. The Works Progress Administration (W.P.A.) was formed. The program built the old swimming pool in Mansfield and the old Mansfield High School brick Gymnasium. Several other schools in the parish got gyms; however, they were made of wood.

Wed
19
Feb
Edgar's picture

Hey, Let’s Talk!

Hey, Let’s Talk!

Last weekend I decided to clean out my old recipe box. It’s a small metal index card box crammed full of 44 years of recipes and it badly needed sorting and/or culling. When my Daughter and Son were little they would take the little stickers off of fruit and vegetables that we bought at the grocery and stick them on my little box when we got home. AND It is now completely covered in them!

I was able to clean and organize it a little and curiously found several old comics and cartoons having to do with cooking stuff that I’d saved. I think I’m gonna put them all in a frame and to hang in the kitchen. Looking through old recipes I found an old one from the Baton Rouge Morning Advocate’s series by Emeril Lagasse called “Sautéed Chicken Breasts With Dijon Herb Sauce.” Doesn’t that sound good? The “Herb Sauce” calls for Tarragon which I hadn’t ever cooked with so that meant the project was a GO for Saturday.

 

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