Columns

Wed
05
Jun
Edgar's picture

Hey, Let’s Talk!

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Did you know there is a ‘Buttermilk Snake’ here i n Louisiana? It is non-poisonous is long and slender like a Coachwhip and is light blue with creamy white speckles. I actually have seen one once when I was driving our parish’s backroads. Today’s title isn’t about a new species of bluespeckled catfish but about a new way I read about frying them.

Columnist Korsha Wilson was writing about the Atlanta based chef Todd Richard and his different takes on traditional soul food dishes that his mother cooked when he was a child. He says that she made fried catfish on Fridays and it was in her weekly rotation of dishes. Not unlike our heavily Catholic influenced tradition of Fish on Friday here in Louisiana. Here we have traditions of Friday Fish (or seafood) and of Monday Red Beans and Rice – AND if Todd were a chef over here he would pronounce his name ‘Ree-Charde’.

Wed
29
May
Edgar's picture

The Business Doctor: Small Towns: It Can Happen To Any Town

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After noticing many shifts in communities around the world some good and some not so good I write this piece to try an divert a collapse in our rural communities. I hope to bring an active awareness to help stop these communities from dying. I will list and discuss in depth many factors but there are a few that deserve mentioning but I will not discuss in depth. Such as several of our large employers have been sold and changed leadership without the community being fully aware of what was in the deal. The lack of love for the community from the private sector’s leadership meaning how often do you see the top CEO’s or Presidents of the largest employers spreading their personal appearance or involvement in the community. Another no mention is one size fits all or outright horrible government policies contributing destruction to small towns and rural areas. Finally the decline and loss of respect of the churches.

Wed
29
May
Edgar's picture

Hey, Let’s Talk! A “Claire Lake” Fishing Trip

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“Claire Lake” is how we here in DeSoto Parish pronounce “Clear Lake”. It’s right in that same syntax as “Poke Street”, “ByPier”, “Mance-Field” and others. When I first moved back to town a few years back I purposely pronounced “Polk Street” correctly when giving directions and was asked, “Where’s that?”

So, in this column I want to share a fun fishing trip my Dad and I had on our own local Clear Lake. It is a beautiful cypress filled lake full of spanish moss, “Walla-Mocksins”, alligators AND is one of my favorite places in the whole world. Back when I was growing up in the ‘50s and ‘60s it was good for fishing, duck hunting and even water skiing. Created by a dam erected in 1953 on the south end of adjoining Smithport Lake and pre-dating Toledo Bend it was a fun picnic destination and surrounded by camp houses.

Wed
22
May
Edgar's picture

Hey, Let’s Talk!

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“A name (…), as I might name my cat,” says Sam Sifton who is the Editor of the NYT Cooking section and a pretty funny guy when he was writing about a new dessert he created. It is what he calls a no recipe recipe and sounds real good, in fact I just might try it this weekend.

Most of you know I love to cook and to try new recipes but just am not good at pastry or gravy or desserts. However, Sam’s sounded so simple that I thought I would share it with you and give it a try, too. He starts his column by stating, “I like canned peaches, and if that bums you out, I don’t know what to tell you.” He goes on to talk about mayonnaise sandwiches and other good things that aren’t good for you but ends with, “These are all defensible positions – but I get it.”

 

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Wed
22
May
Edgar's picture

Did You Know?

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While reading earlier articles and thinking about assembling them into some kinda book form this writer remembered that he had an unfinished portion on ‘Patriotic Questions’. The twelve that were discussed in the earlier article used all of the available space then so be patient as we finish the rest.

14. Name the 13 original states: N.H., Mass, R.I., Conn., N.Y., Penn., Del., Maryland, Virg., N.C., S.C., and Ga.

15. Who was the oldest delegate to sign the Constitution? Benjamin Franklin at 81.

16. What did the Emancipation Proclamation do? Freed the slaves in the Confederate states.

17. Who was Susan B. Anthony? Fought for women’s right to vote.

18. Who did the United States fight in W.W.II? Japan, Germany, and Italy.

19. What was the main concern during the Cold War after W.W.II ended? Communism.

 

Wed
15
May
Edgar's picture

Along the Way

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D e a r Christian H i g h School Graduate, You’re about to walk into a world filled with people who are anti-Jesus, anti-Christian, and full of mockery about your faith in God.

Inevitably, a college professor or colleague is going to be an atheist or from a false religious system. Are you armed and ready? Or do you just know superficial reasons for your beliefs based on feelings, emotions, or other people?

In this column, I can’t go into all of the things that you’ll be ultimately be faced with regarding Christianity and the Lord Jesus Christ, but you can see my full letter to you at www.MindsetoftheSpirit.blogspot.com.

However, for now, let me give you a few things to carry with you, things to hopefully get you started on a track of learning more about your faith so that you are “always ready to give an answer to everyone who asks you to give a reason for the hope that is within you” (1 Peter 3:15).

 

Wed
15
May
Edgar's picture

The Farm Wife

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Most everyone has heard of the importance and great benefit of compost. It is a vital natural addition to any garden, whether you are growing flowers, vegetables or herbs. But what exactly is compost? The simple version is it is a balanced mixture of ‘greens’ and ‘browns’ that when mixed together creates heat. That heat begins to break down the pile, and after a couple of turnings, ends up a granular mixture similar to dirt. It is loaded with great nutrients that will feed your plants and help them to grow.

Greens are your wet materials - food scraps, manure, grass clippings, and the dead remnants when you clean out your garden. This is the nitrogen producer in your bin. Browns are your dry materials -hay, leaves, sawdust and straw. This is the carbon, as well as a ‘wick’ for excess moisture. When layered, moistened and left to sit, heat begins to build up and break down the solids.

 

 

Wed
15
May
Edgar's picture

Hey, Let’s Talk!

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OR Happy May 1st Eve – What?! Oh yes, let me tell you about another treasure excursion that Susan and I had last week. I first heard about Walpurgis Night years ago when I read Bram Stoker’s excellent book ‘Dracula’ - The book that started the whole Vampire myth in Western Europe. Everyone knows all about that so no need in rehashing the legends and so on BUT early in the novel when a mysterious coachman takes Jonathan Harker, our brave lawyer on his way to get some legal documents signed, to Count Dracula’s castle something mysterious happens. Jonathan notices that the coach stops several times and the coachman jumps down, runs toward a strange green light and leaves a marker. Over a late dinner Dracula explains that the lights were traces of evil spirits out on Walpurgis Night that were drawn to hidden treasure.

 

 

Wed
15
May
Edgar's picture

Did You Know?

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The history of DeSoto Parish is intimately connected to the men and women of the past years. Yes, they made DeSoto with their dedication and hard work. Several men and women have been written about in this column most of whom this writer knew and felt should be remembered. Of course, there have been hundreds of people who should be remembered but you understand all cannot be written about – only a representative group.

Wed
08
May
Edgar's picture

Along the Way

If religion were just an “opiate for the masses,” or if it evolved primitively to help people cope with things out of their control (such as death, illness, natural disasters, etc.), then it is reasonable to say that anyone could come up with any religious theory from the depths of their imaginations and that every theory would be equally valid.

No theory would be right or wrong, good or bad.

And none of them would be absolute.

However, Jesus Christ made this type of theorizing obsolete.

When Jesus walked this Earth, He made two major radical claims: He said that He was God in the flesh; and He said that He was the only way to Heaven.

 

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