Columns

Wed
01
May
Edgar's picture

Did You Know?

While reading some of the old issues of the Mansfield Enterprise at the Mansfield Female College Museum I noticed a number of interesting businesses that were located in the city in earlier years. Some of you older readers might remember them today.

In the 1933 issues, there was a story of the Mansfield Coffin and Casket Company located on South Washington Ave. where the former sweet plant had operated. Mr. J.E. Herbert was the owner and master carpenter. The article further stated that everyone was welcomed to come by and “… View those on display”. It was a common practice for people to purchase their caskets before death and many bought the casket to be stored at their homes. Another early practice before Drewett’s Funeral Home came to Mansfield was stores having caskets in stock or being able to order them quickly. This writer remembers the large store in Keatchie having caskets on display on the second floor.

Wed
24
Apr
Edgar's picture

Hey, Let’s Talk!

I stumbled across a good sounding recipe the other day at the ‘My Recipes’ website called “Cheesy

Chili Hash Brown Bake” from the Southern Living magazine in February 2011. It sounded so good and so easy to make but alot like another recipe with Tater Tots by my best ole Breaux Bill Love. So I knew that I was gonna do a little research on these.

I learned from our Parish Historian and my friend/mentor, Mr. Powell, that writers need to be held accountable for what they write so that history will remain correct. Names need to be spelled correctly and dates need to be right. That’s why I try to do a little research before I write my columns and this often leads to additional interesting information about the subject - It was the same with these two in the title. Have you ever wondered about where they started or who invented them? Wellll ….

 

 

Wed
24
Apr
Edgar's picture

Did You Know?

Several weeks ago, this column was devoted to the various towns in DeSoto Parish. It was stated that the list did not include all of the communities of the parish. DeSoto Parish is proud of its town and communities. The following will not complete the list but only add additional ones that we certainly want to remember.

Carmel – A small community located about 7 miles east of Mansfield on Hwy 509. The village grew up from the area served by the Carmelite Monastery founded in 1888 at the Bayou Pierre Church by members of the Carmelite Order of the Catholic Church. The name Carmel translates to ”Garden of Gods”. The beautiful little Rock Chapel is located at Carmel.

Dolet Hills – Located in southeastern part of DeSoto Parish is named after a French Creole, Pierre Dolet, who made a settlement along Bayou Adays in 1795. Pierre Dolet was a large cattle owner who ran cattle over most of present day southern DeSoto Parish.

 

 

Wed
17
Apr
Edgar's picture

Pat’s Chat

This weekend must have been prom weekend for nearly everybody. Lots of pretty pictures o n Facebook. Saturday was terrible weather. Coach Walker, one of the coaches at Stanley, had a tree fall through his house.

Abbie Wood and Lance Lafitte had their wedding Saturday night. I didn’t try to go as the weather was too bad.

Sunday afternoon at 2:00 we had Ellie Clark’s birthday party at an athletic place in Shreveport.

I went Friday for my MRI on my back, not realizing it wasn’t until Monday.

Thursday at quilting Johnny Gibb’s wife Nancy and said he had fallen in the floor and couldn’t get up. When she got home, they realized he had had a stroke, so they called an ambulance and took him to Willis Knighton North. Wednesday Susan Sibley had a stoke and was transported to Willis Knighton Piermont. At this time she is not doing very well.

 

Wed
17
Apr
Edgar's picture

Did You Know?

Over the past several years I have written articles about many men and women that have had profound influence on the City of Mansfield and on DeSoto Parish. They should all be remembered but none would, in the opinion of this writer, be more deserving than Dr. George A. Ritchey.

Dr. Ritchey was born in Enterprise, Ms. and later attended Pearl River Com. College in Poplarville, Ms. where he lettered in football, baseball, basketball and track. He was converted while a student there in 1926. He later attended Mississippi College in Clinton, Ms. where he played football and pastored two churches in Duncan and Friar’s Point, Ms. He continued his education in the ministry at the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville, Ky. And graduated from there with a Masters of Theology degree in 1933. He earned a Doctors of Philosophy degree in 1935 while a student at Louisville, Ky. and was a pastor of a church in Paragon, Indiana.

Wed
10
Apr
Edgar's picture

The Farm Wife

Learn To Cook

Not everyone loves to cook, but it isn’t difficult to learn. There was a joke in our family that said my sister Amie couldn’t boil water without burning it. Truthfully, she wasn’t that bad, but she wasn’t that good, either. Today, Amie is a Registered Dietitian and can cook with the best of them. Her jams and jellies are always in demand and she never hesitates to bring something delicious to any potluck. If Amie can learn, then there is hope for everyone!

Wed
10
Apr
Edgar's picture

Did You Know?

By Raymond Powell

The American people have always been a generous people even in the early colonial days neighbors came to the aide of people in need. Some early examples were house fire victims, barn raisings, widows, etc. Mansfield even had the poor farm in front of the present day airport where a house and farm acreage was given to families for one year.

The ultimate in “good heartiness” of Americans was the Marshall Plan at the close of WW II. Most of our younger generation is not familiar with the program that helped devastated the war-torn nations get back on their feet. The close of WW II Europe lay in shambles. Cities and factories, especially rail transportation, were shattered and countless people faced hunger, most countries economic were on the verge of collapse. The stage was set for dictators and communism.

 

Wed
03
Apr
Edgar's picture

Along the Way

Even though doubt is sometimes looked at negatively within the Christian life, not all doubt is bad or harmful. In fact, how we handle times of doubt can actually deepen our faith in God.

Our ability to reason is a gift from God, so He can handle any question we come up with. After all, God did command us to love him with our minds (Matt. 22:37).

To gain a profound intimacy with God, we are to know what we believe and why. It’s important to know that Christianity is not based on emotion, but rather on evidence. Our feelings about God’s presence in our lives at all times may come and go, but that does not change the facts or the evidence.

Those who have solid reasons for God’s existence — for who God is and what He has done — can stand upon those unshakable convictions in times of doubt. And this is because those convictions are based on firm evidence, not varying emotions.

 

 

Wed
03
Apr
Edgar's picture

Did You Know?

It is hoped that readers of this column have a wide range of historical interest. Today’s article deals with the Yellow Fever epidemic which is often compared to the Bubonic Plague which was so deathly in Medieval Europe.

Yellow Fever was introduced into the United States in the 1790’s along the eastern seaboard in ports such as Philadelphia and New York by sailors from ships that had come through the port in Haiti. Philadelphia was especially hard hit with the loss of life to almost one fourth of its population. Some historians contribute Yellow Fever to causing Philadelphia to fall behind in growth and never realizing its potential as a city that it should have been.

Wed
27
Mar
Edgar's picture

Hey, Let’s Talk!

We ‘Boomers’ remember the ole Walter Lanz Saturday cartoons featuring that raucous (and annoying) red-headed woodpecker. AND I saw Woody earlier in the week pecking on the big ole downed virgin pine that the intrepid Donny Averitt felled for me last Summer. Actually this bird was a Pileated Woodpecker that dwells in our North American forests and exclusively eats insects in & under tree bark. They especially like to de-bark a dead or dying tree and eat the bugs they find. In fact, this one that I saw was de-barking the big pine log that Donny had felled and I watched him for about an hour on and off as he chipped and hammered away at the bark on about half of that log. Drive by my house on Laura St. in Mansfield, La. and you can see that for yourself. It was an inspiring site because he was so big and I sure hope he comes back to finish the job so I can see him again!

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