Columns

Wed
09
Jan
Edgar's picture

Did You Know?

Someone recently asked how the topics were chosen that I write about each week. It took a few moments of thought to give an answer – even after giving an answer it wasn’t necessarily a correct and certainly not a complete one.

Several years ago John Blanchard, editor of the Mansfield Enterprise, knowing my interest in history, encouraged me to write about the history of Mansfield and DeSoto Parish. This has always been my main focus - “Preservation of the history of our area.” Mansfield and DeSoto Parish didn’t just happen – it was the result of brave men and women working to make it the good place that it is. We also have a great nation and the same thing that made DeSoto Parish great made our nation great.

Wed
09
Jan
Edgar's picture

Hey, Let’s Talk! Bruschetta

I sure hope everyone had a safe and happy new year’s celebration, a big pot of lucky “Hoppin’ John” AND let me be one of the first to say, “Happy New Year” - Let’s make 2019 the best ever!

With all of the holiday’s heavy eating and rich dishes (yes, I’m looking at YOU cornbread dressing and pecan pie!) I was thinking some kinda lite anti-pasta type dish would be good. The ‘Pampered Chef’ had a nice sounding different dish called “Pasta Bruschetta” that I tried and want to share with you.

I did a little research and found that ‘Bruschetta’ is a popular anti-pasta in Italy and Spain and is served over different meats or vegetables, pasta or grilled Panini style bread slices. The most popular uses tomatoes like this recipe does. The ‘Pampered Chef ’ wants you to add spaghetti that’s been broken in half to a rapidly boiling pot of chicken broth and cook until almost done (al dente) then drain and sprinkle with a little olive oil on top and set aside.

 

Wed
09
Jan
Edgar's picture

DeSoto Krewes Prepare for Mardi Gras Season Celebrations

With the Epiphany on January 6, or “Twelve Days of Christmas”, climaxing the Advent/Christmas Season, DeSoto Parish residents are ready to join Louisianans statewide for the Carnival season, ending with Mardi Gras, which is French for Fat Tuesday. The Christian holiday is full of celebration in preparation for the upcoming Lenten season, which begins on Ash Wednesday. Lenten is a time of fasting and religious obligations, with many indulging in richer, fatty foods before the fasting, or giving up of a favorite item, for Lenten sacrifice.

Wearing masks and costumes, plus having parades and parties, are images that all come to mind when the word “Mardi Gras” is heard. While Logansport has held Krewe of Aquarius Mardi Gras parades and parties since 2002, Mansfield began participating in the fun season in 2015.

Wed
02
Jan
Edgar's picture

Along the Way

I enjoy listening to YouTube talks by some of the world’s most brilliant Christian apologists. One of those apologists is Dr. John Lennox, a Northern Irish mathematician who is Emeritus Professor of Mathematics at the University of Oxford. He holds two doctorates — one in mathematics and another in philosophy. Dr. Lennox has spoken in many different countries on Christian philosophy, debated famous atheists such as Richard Dawkins and the late Christopher Hitchens, and published numerous books on Christian apologetics.

Recently, on a video I was watching, Dr. Lennox was asked this question: “Do you ever doubt that you might be wrong about all the beliefs that you hold about Christianity?”

Here, I want to share with you the response by Dr. Lennox:

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Wed
02
Jan
Edgar's picture

Hey, Let’s Talk! A Christmas Miracle by Van Reech

I’m having a real good Christmas week – one of the best ever – and I hope all of you are, too. M y Daughter and Granddaughter came down with friends to share presents and Christmas Eve Dinner. I did my standard roast turkey and Mama’s cornbread dressing but the kids brought scalloped potatoes, macaroni and cheese, spinach soufflé and a big ham. Whow! Surprisingly we had few leftovers because several guests stopped by to “snack”. That’s just fine because now I need to start getting ready for New Years with another ham, boiled cabbage, a big pot of “Hoppin’ John” blackeyed pea jambalaya and, of course, a good skillet of cornbread. I may do ‘hot water cornbread’ this year?

Thu
20
Dec
admin's picture

Hey, Let’s Talk! Christmas Loot!

Remember when you were a kid a t Christmas and how excited you were about Santa coming or wondering what kinda presents you had waiting under the tree? Well, that’s sorta how I felt last weekend but I first want to report in on the Baked Chicken Tenders and Catfish recipes we talked about last week.

Brenda Hall and Trever Montgomery both told me they were gonna try these because they sounded so good and healthy because they weren’t fried. I found on the Baked Tenders that they needed to be cooked in a hotter oven (on broil @ 500 ) and a little longer (10 to 12 minutes ). And after trying the catfish I thought that dusting them with just plain cornmeal adding only salt and pepper didn’t get them spicy enough. The one fillet that I had sprinkled with some Crystal Hot Sauce before dusting tasted the best.

Thu
20
Dec
admin's picture

Along the Way

As a child growing up on the outskirts of Mansfield, I helped my mom make homemade pralines and fudge each year on Christmas Eve. Well, I don’t know how “helpful” I was, but I loved to watch and “lick the bowls.”

She would put the pralines and fudge out on Christmas Eve, which for us was a bigger, more thrilling day than Christmas Day because the whole family came over to our house. And honestly, “whole family” just meant our two first cousins, aunt and uncle, and grandparents. But it seemed like a large crowd to us.

Mom always put out several gifts for us to open on Christmas Eve, and then the rest were put out by “Santa” to be opened on Christmas morning. Well, my sisters and I used to wait until Mom went to the store and then we would carefully unwrap our gifts that were under the tree. We would inspect them, and then meticulously tape the wrapping paper back on.

Wed
12
Dec
Edgar's picture

Did You Know?

By Raymond Powell

Few people have lived through the Great Depression but everyone has read and heard about it. This writer not only lived throughout the Depression but experienced some of its hardships. If you will bear with me some researched details will be presented to set the stage.

On Friday October 24, 1929 the U.S. stock market crashed which started the 12 year economic disaster known as the Great Depression. On that “Black Thursday” everyone knew the sudden massive sell off of stocks was bad but no one knew just how calamitous the results would be. Given the last two months prior to Oct. 24, 1929 it was thought things were going along as fine as they always had.

 

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Wed
12
Dec
Edgar's picture

Hey, Let’s Talk! Baked Chicken Tenders

By: Van Reech

A few years ago before I learned the “Thick Black Iron Pot” trick of frying Catfish up right I used to coat the fillets with Tabasco Sauce and dust them in the prepared cornmeal mixture and bake them in the oven. They were very close to the fried fish I loved and we ate them at least once a week so when I saw Alison Roman’s recipe for Baked Tenders I knew I had to try them.

Wed
05
Dec
Edgar's picture

Did You Know?

By Raymond Powell

During the Civil War there were spies on both sides in the North and the South. It has never been determined exactly why they risked their lives to spy on a certain side. Women were the most successful spies and today’s article is about a woman form New Orleans who spied for the Union. She was known as “Crazy Lou”, Lou Arness that is, who was from a wealthy family that had actually owned slaves but like many southern slave owners they were being given their freedom even before the war began.

During the war Lou’s home became a hiding place for escaping Union prisoners and runaway slaves. They were housed in the attic with a secret trap door for them to come out at night. Many of them were able to escape to freedom. Horses were confiscated by the freed slaves and convicts. Of course, both Union and Confederates went through town and the countryside looking for horses that were stolen.

 

 

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