Columns

Wed
08
Apr

Did You Know?

Did You Know?

This writer has received a request to write an article on “Double Churches”. This being one of my favorite historical churches and areas of DeSoto Parish it will be a pleasure to jump into that. Double Churches, as the Grove Hill Community is commonly known, is situated about ten miles southeast of Mansfield, some three miles off of La. Hwy 175 at the point where the Grove Hill Road splits. It is part of the 1700’s Pierre Dolet Spanish Land Grant in the Dolet Hills area.

In the 1850 migration of settlers from the eastern states such as the Carolinas, Virginia, and etc. began the settlement of this area. Grove Hill Baptist Church was organized on April 3, 1859 and meetings were in the homes of the individuals. Mrs. Elizabeth Williams Etheredge sold them ten acres for $20 and the families built the first church. Mrs. Etheredge later donated land for the cemetery in the same area. The present building was dedicated on July 9, 1859.

 

Wed
08
Apr

Hey, Let’s Talk!

Hey, Let’s Talk!

NO, not the title of that Doors song:

“Strange Days have found us, strange days have tracked us down.

They’re gonna destroy our casual joys and try to bring us down.”

But more like the challenging times we are living now. How sobering this enforced quasi-quarantine is but I’ve been inspired by several things these past few days and want to share these with you. Small things, sure, but isn’t that what most of life is made up of ? Isn’t that what you miss the most when you remember back on good times?? We shouldn’t let these strange times “destroy our casual joys” as bad ole Jim Morrison sings.

 

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Wed
01
Apr

Hey, Let’s Talk!

Hey, Let’s Talk!

*With all this crazy COVID 19 Panic going on I am digging down into my freezer and finding all kinda good things. The newest discovery was turkey from Thanksgiving and i decided to venture into my Column Vault and re-do a column on my Mother’s Turkey Tetrazzini - still good after all this time.

When I was young my Mother used to finish off the remains of that big ole turkey remains by making a turkey carcass gumbo. It was so good, but I’ve kinda gotten away from that and tend to have some breast slices for the next work week lunch sandwiches and enough leftover carvings off of the carcass for a turkey casserole. Almost any casserole can be made with the turkey substituted for the meat called for in the recipe, but better in the ‘fowl based’ casseroles – turkey enchiladas or turkey loaf or turkey spaghetti with tomato gravy just aren’t to my taste. Turkey jambalaya? Don’t even go there! HOWEVER, turkey in an Alfredo Sauce is just right!

Wed
01
Apr

Along the Way

Along the Way

Just like many others during this quarantine, I’ve organized things, read a lot, baked too much, and enjoyed simple but priceless time with my kids. One great book I’ve read over these past two weeks and highly recommend is The Tattooist of Auschwitz by Heather Morris. Absolutely excellent true story. I’ve already baked two pans of brownies, a vanilla bundt cake drizzled with Eagle Brand, peanut butter cookies, and homemade energy bars that include peanut butter, honey, oats, flax seed, cinnamon and vanilla. Oh, and yes, I do provide apples, bananas, yogurt, milk, and sandwiches on wheat bread!

My kids, like so many other siblings, have bonded more than usual. I’ve enjoyed sitting on the back patio and watching them play soccer, shoot hoops, and even lie on lounge chairs in the sun, chatting and listening to music.

Wed
01
Apr

Did You Know?

Did You Know?

When French and Spanish explorers first arrived in this area they found a thriving culture established by the Caddo-Addai and the Caddo Nachitosh Indian Tribes. The two tribes were part of the larger Caddo Indian Group. They were a semi-nomadic people meaning they lived in an area for a few years and moved to better hunting and fishing when those were thinned out. During the several years of living in one place they built homes of poles and thatched grass wall and roofs similar the shape of a beehive.

The Caddo men were not particularly bad fighters except when attacked. The women were expert weavers of rugs and pottery makers. Both men and women tanned animal skins into clothes. However, the early French explorers said the women were better at tanning hides than the men.

Wed
25
Mar

Along the Way

Along the Way

As I write this, we are about a week into selfdistancing due to Covid-19. My three kids are being h o m e - schooled, I haven’t left the house except to make a

Kroger run, and life as we knew it before the coronavirus quarantine is no more.

Even though this sometimes seems like the Twilight Zone, I fully recognize that it’s true and that it’s redefining priorities and perspectives.

When this is over, I know I won’t be the same.

 

 

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Wed
25
Mar

Hey, Let’s Talk!

Hey, Let’s Talk!

Yes, … there – I said it. I apologize for thinking that I had invented a new Italian dish as in the B r o d o Classico or Pasta Broth that I wrote about a few columns back, Mi Dispiace’. Although as a disclaimer, I did mutter that the simple broth I thought I had invented couldn’t possibly be new and surely should have been discovered earlier. AND, yep - it had; In 1550 in Northern Italy and called Tortellini En Brodo. When I sent the original column out by email one of my earliest readers and oldest friend, Janis from South Louisiana, pointed out that when she lived in Italy there was a broth like the one I had “discovered”.

Wed
25
Mar

Did You Know?

Did You Know?

With the interest in the preserving of the Nabors Trailers Sign headed up by David Calhoun it appears appropriate for a historical article to be written about W.C. Nabors, the owner and founder of the Nabors Trailers Company. W.C. (Will) Nabors was born in Naborton, La. on Dec. 16, 1877. There aren’t many people living today that knew Mr. Nabors personally. This writer knew him but not on a social level.

Wed
18
Mar

Hey, Let’s Talk!

Hey, Let’s Talk!

What?! Yes, I bought several of these 2” thick 25” wide laminated wood countertops at Southeastern Freight in Shreveport, La. Well, it’s actually Acacia Wood but there was another called Curupa Wood from Bolivia that was even more dramatic than the Acacia Wood from Thailand I liked. I bastardized the name when I called in to check availability and couldn’t remember Curupa. All I could remember was that the name sounded like that little South American monster called the Chupacabra. It’s supposed to be kinda bat-like and vaguely canine looking and feeds by sucking blood from cows and goats. In fact its name really means “Goat Sucker” in Spanish. One was supposedly captured in Mexico awhile back but it really only looked like a coyote with mange. BUT, my lifesaver - Anna Dunn - tells me that one was plaguing Grand Cane a couple of years back killing cats and dogs. She said she saw it and remembers long hind legs kinda like a rabbit!

Wed
18
Mar

Did You Know?

Did You Know?

The other day I had a conversation about the food for the winter of this area about 150 years ago that stirred my “Historical Senses”. During and shortly after the Civil War hard times for everyone, especially the rural and small towns of North Louisiana. The population was largely Anglo-Celtic or African in origin with some Spanish-French along the eastern edge of DeSoto Parish and to Natchitoches southward. Corn and pork were the main crops but there were three times more hogs than beef cattle. There were Irish and sweet potatoes and some sugar cane for making syrup. Cotton was by far the major money crop.

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